KusGribiNedir.com

Avian influenza, Bird Flu Latest News, Cold Flu News


World's oldest insect inspires a new generation of aerogels

Experts have created a new form of highly-efficient, low-cost, sustainable insulation based on the wings of a dragonfly.

Belief in fake causes of cancer is rife

Mistaken belief in mythical causes of cancer is rife according to new research.

Napping can help tired teens' performance in school

Researchers have found a positive relationship between midday-napping and nighttime sleep. They believe it might be key to boosting neurocognitive function in early adolescents. The team examined adolescents in Jintan, China, measuring midday napping, nighttime sleep duration and sleep quality, and performance on multiple neurocognitive tasks. Habitual nappers (who napped more often) tended to have a better nighttime sleep.

A Yellowstone guide to life on Mars

A geology student is helping NASA determine whether life existed on other planets. He is helping find a marker for ancient bacterial life on Mars. The research could help scientists put to rest one of our most fundamental mysteries.

Many low-lying atoll islands could be uninhabitable by mid-21st century

Sea-level rise and wave-driven flooding will negatively impact freshwater resources on many low-lying atoll islands in such a way that many could be uninhabitable in just a few decades.

Projectile cannon experiments show how asteroids can deliver water

New research shows that a surprising amount of water survives simulated asteroid impacts, a finding that may help explain how asteroids deposit water throughout the solar system.

Ultrahigh-pressure laser experiments shed light on super-Earth cores

Using high-powered laser beams, researchers have simulated conditions inside a planet three times as large as Earth. The pressures achieved in this study, up to 1,314 gigapascals (GPa), allowed researchers to gather the highest-pressure X-ray diffraction data ever recorded and generate new, more robust models for the interior structure of large, rocky exoplanets.

New link between sleep arousals and body temperature may also be connected to SIDS

What is the origin of these arousals? Scientists have discovered that brief arousals are probably triggered by the intrinsic electrical noise from wake-promoting neurons (WPN) in the brain. Their research reveals a previously unrecognized neurophysiological mechanism that links sleep arousals with temperature regulation, and may also provide an important new link between temperature and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

World's smallest optical implantable biodevice

Researchers have built a new optical device no bigger than the edge of a coin. The device includes a photovoltaic cell that is powered by infrared light and emits blue light. Using infrared light allows the device to be implanted several centimeters deep into the body, while the emission of blue light can be used for optogenetic control of brain patterns.

Weather associated with sentiments expressed on social media

Sentiments expressed on Facebook and Twitter may be associated with certain weather patterns.

Massive study across western equatorial Africa finds more gorillas and chimpanzees than expected

A massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa's gorillas and chimpanzees has uncovered both good news and bad about our nearest relatives. The good news: there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought. The bad news: the vast majority of these great apes (80 percent) exist outside of protected areas, and gorilla populations are declining by 2.7 percent annually.

New approach to treating patients with stage IV Wilms tumor

A new study shows significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases.

Brain structure linked to symptoms of restless legs syndrome

People with restless legs syndrome may have changes in a portion of the brain that processes sensory information, according to a new study.

Balancing nuclear and renewable energy

Researchers explore the benefits of adjusting the output of nuclear power plants according to the changing supply of renewable energy such as wind and solar power.

Russian Arctic glacier loss doubles as temps warm

Ice mass loss in the Russian Arctic has nearly doubled over the last decade.

When do problems with memory and decision-making affect older adults' ability to drive?

Recently, a team of researchers designed a study to learn more about cognitive health and older drivers' crash risks. The study focused on links between levels of cognitive function and crash risk among older drivers without dementia over a 14-year study period. They also assessed the link between changes in cognitive function over time and later risks of crashes.

Drug-filled, 3-D printed dentures could fight off infections

Researchers have developed 3-D printed dentures filled with antifungal medication to better treat oral fungal infections.

Emerging memory devices used to develop electronic circuits for cybersecurity applications

While we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, targeted attacks can result in major damage; when cybercriminals control and manipulate several nodes in a network, the potential for destruction increases.

Engineers get a grip on slippery surfactants

A group's innovative surfactant theory removes limitations of a 100-year-old model for interfacial behavior in enhanced oil recovery.

3-D print electronics and cells printed directly on skin

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers used a customized, low-cost 3-D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics.

Stress hormones spike as the temperature rises

A new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer.

Tiny frequency combs are reliable measurement tools

In an advance that could shrink many measurement technologies, scientists have demonstrated the first miniaturized devices that can generate desired frequencies, or colors, of light precisely enough to be traced to an international measurement standard.

Einstein's 'spooky action' goes massive

The elusive quantum mechanical phenomenon of entanglement has now been made a reality in objects almost macroscopic in size. Results show how two vibrating drumheads, the width of a human hair, can display the spooky action that famously troubled Albert Einstein.

One in every six deaths in young adults is opioid-related

One out of every six deaths among young adults in Ontario is related to opioids, suggests a new study.

Assembly of massive galaxy cluster witnessed for the first time

For the first time, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a colossal cluster of galaxies. Their observations reveal at least 14 galaxies packed into an area only four times the diameter of the Milky Way's galactic disk. Computer simulations of the galaxies predict that over time the cluster will assemble into one of the most massive structures in the modern universe.

Long-sought structure of telomerase paves way for new drugs for aging, cancer

Telomerase, because of its role in cancer and aging, has long been a target of drug companies who want to block it to stop the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer, or boost it to create a fountain of youth. The structure of the enzyme complex has been a mystery, however, until now. Scientists have finally obtained a detailed picture of the architecture of the RNA-protein complex, a breakthrough for drug design.

Synaptic communication controls neuronal migration

Development of the mammalian neocortex requires the precise migration of billions of neurons. Synapses are structures that allow neurons to communicate with each other. Scientists have now identified a novel role of synapses in neuronal migration during neocortical development. They show that transient synapses are formed between subplate neurons, which function as guidance cells, and newborn neurons. This interaction promotes the proper migration of newborn neurons.

Redefining the origin of the cellular powerhouse

Researchers proposes a new evolutionary origin for mitochondria -- also known as the 'powerhouses of the cell.' Mitochondria are energy-converting organelles that have played key roles in the emergence of complex cellular life on Earth.

Switch controls light on a nanoscale for faster information processing

Researchers have helped design a compact switch that enables light to be more reliably confined to small computer chip components for faster information processing.

After a volcano erupts, bird colonies recover

Where do seabirds go when their nesting colony is buried by a volcano? In 2008, the eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutian archipelago provided a rare opportunity to track how the island's crested and least auklet populations responded when their nesting colony was abruptly destroyed. As a new study shows, the birds were surprisingly adaptable, establishing a new colony on freshly created habitat nearby in only four years.

To see the first-born stars of the universe

ASU-led team aims to use new NASA space telescope to capture light from the first stars to be born in the universe.

Protect forest elephants to conserve ecosystems, not DNA

New research has found that forest elephant populations across Central Africa are genetically quite similar to one another. Conserving this critically endangered species across its range is crucial to preserving local plant diversity in Central and West African Afrotropical forests -- meaning conservationists could save many species by protecting one.

Agent 007: Organic Molecules as bearers of secrets

In the digital age, security of sensitive information is of utmost importance. Many data are encrypted these methods use a password for decryption, and in most cases, exactly this password is the entrance gate for hackers. Scientists use a new and highly secure approach by combining computer science with chemistry and a conventional encryption method with a chemical password.

Maternal binge drinking linked to mood problems and alcohol abuse in offspring

A new study is the first to show that binge drinking by expectant mothers can impair the mental health of their offspring. Researchers report that rat mothers who drank in a binge-like manner during pregnancy and lactation were more prone to depressive behaviors -- and so were their offspring. Moreover, alcohol-triggered heritable changes in the mother made their offspring more vulnerable to mood disturbances and alcohol abuse as adolescents.

Turning graphene into light nanosensors

Graphene has many properties, but it does not absorb light very well. To remedy this, physicists resort to embedding a sheet of graphene in a flat photonic crystal. Scientists now demonstrate that by altering the temperature in such a hybrid cavity structure, they can tune its capacity for optical absorption. This means graphene-based nano-devices could potentially be used as temperature-sensitive sensors.

Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in space

In an experiment that mimics astrophysical conditions, with cryogenic temperatures in an ultrahigh vacuum, scientists used an electron gun to irradiate thin sheets of ice covered in basic molecules of methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide, the building blocks of life. The experiment tested how the combination of electrons and basic matter leads to more complex biomolecule forms -- and perhaps eventually to life forms.

Precision optical components created with inkjet printing

Researchers have developed an inkjet printing technique that can be used to print optical components such as waveguides, an approach that could advance a variety of devices such as optical sensors used for health monitoring and lab-on-a-chip devices.

Brain folding provides researchers with an accurate marker to predict psychosis

By using images of the brain to look at how the grey matter is folded on itself, researchers can predict which high-risk patients will develop psychosis with more than 80 per cent accuracy.

Rhythm crucial in drummed speech

Researchers have carried out research into the drummed speech system of the Bora people of the Northwest Amazon. They found the Boras not only reproduce the melody of words and sentences in this endangered language, but also their rhythm. This suggests the crucial role of linguistic rhythm in language processing has been underestimated.

Exposure to domestic violence costs US government $55 billion each year

The federal government spends an estimated $55 billion annually on dealing with the effects of childhood exposure to domestic violence, according to new research.

'Incompatible' donor stem cells cure adult sickle cell patients

Doctors have cured seven adult patients of sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder primarily affecting the black community, using stem cells from donors previously thought to be incompatible, thanks to a new transplant treatment protocol.

Magma ocean may be responsible for the moon's early magnetic field

Around four billion years ago, the moon had a magnetic field that was about as strong as Earth's magnetic field is today. How the moon, with a much smaller core than Earth's, could have had such a strong magnetic field has been an unsolved problem in the history of the moon's evolution. A new model proposes that a magma ocean may be responsible.

Human impact on sea urchin abundance

In a 50-year study, researchers record the dynamics of three common species of sea urchins in Hatakejima Island, Wakayama.

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer

From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties.

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns

As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment.

Archaeologists on ancient horse find in Nile River Valley

An ancient horse burial at Tombos along the Nile River Valley shows that a member of the horse family thousands of years ago was more important to the culture than previously thought, which provides a window into human-animal relationships more than 3,000 years ago.

Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalus

Viruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a surprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, called ependymal cells, report scientists. The researchers discovered that ependymal cells from mice require a continuous production of a transcription factor called Foxj1 to maintain their shape and function. Viruses known to infect the brain have found a way to shut down the production of Foxj1 and disable the cells, the researchers show.

Watching nanomaterials form in 4-D

A team has developed a new type of electron microscope that takes dynamic, multi-frame videos of nanoparticles as they form, allowing researchers to view how specimens change in space and time.

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used in oil spills

Two new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines.

How do marine mammals avoid the bends?

Deep-diving whales and other marine mammals can get the bends -- the same painful and potentially life-threatening decompression sickness that strikes scuba divers who surface too quickly. A new study offers a hypothesis of how marine mammals generally avoid getting the bends and how they can succumb under stressful conditions.

Corn with straw mulch builds yield, soil carbon

How do you boost soil water content and soil health without irrigating? Best cover it with a layer of straw, a new study concludes.

Exercise could make the heart younger

After a heart attack, patients must create new heart muscle cells to heal. A new study shows that mice make more new heart muscle cells when they exercise compared to when they do not. This was true for both healthy mice and those that had experienced a heart attack. Findings demonstrate that one reason exercise is beneficial to health is that it increases the heart's capacity to regenerate.

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductors

Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists.

Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identified

Scientists have discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduced the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake.

Oxidative stress makes difference between metabolically abnormal and healthy obesities

Scientists have clarified that deletion of adipose oxidative stress (Fat ROS) decreased lipid accumulation in the liver, clinically improving insulin resistance and inducing metabolically healthy obesity. In fact, Fat ROS suppressed lipid accumulation and increased ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver, worsening insulin resistance.

We still don't know how strange celibate animals evolve

A new study has cast doubt on leading theory for how tiny creatures have evolved for 50 million years -- without ever having sex.

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complication

An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what's known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells attack the body's own organs or tissues.

More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depression

About 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data.

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining

A new study suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization.

Billions of gallons of water saved by thinning forests

There are too many trees in Sierra Nevada forests, say scientists. That may come as a surprise to those who see dense, verdant forests as signs of a healthy environment. After all, green is good, right? Not necessarily. When it comes to the number of trees in California forests, bigger isn't always better.



 
 

 

eXTReMe Tracker